Category Archives: Farm Club

Kileva News Letter #10


CONTENTS

Standard 8 Revision
End of Term Exams
Elephants & Bees Visitors
Visitors from Mexico
End of Term Meeting
Dry season activities
Hyenas Attack
School Maintenance
Communal work


Standard 8 Revision

Report by
Deputy Head Teacher

Today standard 8 candidates were at school seriously revising for their national exam. The turn up was quite encouraging.


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End of Term Exams

Report by
Deputy Head Teacher

Today Kileva Eastfield Primary started end of term exams. Grade 4-8 did sub county exams, while Grade1-3 did their own school based exam.

They started with maths and then English and composition for std4-8. All was well.

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Elephants & Bees Visitors

Report by
Deputy Headteacher

Today we were privileged to have Dr Lucy King from the Elephants & Bees Team and other people from Mexico visit the school. They visited class 8 candidates and interacted with them. They said they were were very much impressed with what they saw, and wished them best of luck in their KCPE (Kenya Certificate of Primary Education) exams.

Mr Nina and Mr Will from Mexico addressed class 8 candidates. Mr will was very much happy with what Mr Nina was teaching. Mr Nina was revising Maths which was done during the end term exams.

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Visitors from Mexico

Report by
Mr George

Today we received visitors from Mexico grandparents of Rachael who donated us with the first aid kit .they were very happy with the kit and pupils of Kileva. I Mr. Mazai (health teacher) and them are seen in the photos with the kits.

We also interacted with the visitors in our farm club. They were very much grateful to our club and the outdoor classroom.

 

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End of Term Meeting

Report by
Deputy Head Teacher, Mdm Beata & Mr Mwakio

Today the school was officially closed. We had a wonderful meeting with parents where we read the results of the sub county exam that we did.

Mdm Beata is with class 5 parents where by she presents gifts to the best performers. Mr Mwakio with mashairi pupils entertaining parents during closing ceremony.

We shall reopen the school on 27/8/18

 

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Dry season activities

Report by
Mdm Aggy

After long rains at the beginning of the year, every one has harvested as much as he/she planted.Now that its august the dry season, everyone has engaged him/herself in different activities: some cultivating their farms and clearing bush ready for the rainy season in October, some have engaged themselves in weaving.

The project was introduces to Mwakoma women by the Carbon Work in cooperation with Save the Elephants.The women were taught how to make baskets, soap dish and others depending on sizes. Thereafter a complete basket is sold at different prices depending on size.

 

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Hyenas Attack

Report by
Mdm Aggy

It has been sleepless nights at mwakoma village becouse of hyenas attacking domestic animals at night.This has happened in many homesteads including madam Agys home. to our suprise no meat is left but only skin peaces .
This problem has made the owners to sleep outside their houses so that when the animals make noise they are ready to rescue their animals,also it has become a challenge to some people to sleep outside becouse this is a cold season.Kenya wildlife service has not yet taken any action so far.

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School Maintenance

The school is continually in need of maintenance work being carried out. For example the latrines are in bad condition, and two windows of Class 3 are almost falling out.

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ECDE Latrine Completed

The ECDE (Early Childhood Development in Education) latrine has been completed thanks to funding provided by the County Government. A1000l litres tank has also been provided.

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Communal work

Report by
Mdm Aggy

The photos below show Kileva parents participating in sand carrying communal work whereby the sand will be used to modify the school kitchen.

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Kileva Newsletter #8


CONTENTS

 

Cowpea Threshing
Wheelbarrow & Spades Gift
Cleaning School Compound
Sagalla Cluster Ball Games
World Environment Day
Lost Maize Harvest
Testing honey badger deterrent methods


Cowpea Threshing

Report by
Mdm Beata in charge of School Lunch Feeding Programme

Below are ‘photos of Kileva Eastfield pupils threshing cowpeas harvested from the school farm. The cowpeas will be cooked for lunch in the school feeding programme.

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Wheelbarrow & Spades Gift

Report by
George Mwaviswa-Farm club Patron

Farm club members receiving a wheelbarrow and two spades from the Elephants and Bees Team of the Save the Elephants organisation:

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Cleaning School Compound

Report by

Mdm Priscillah Nguku Music and dance patron and Teacher on duty

Pictures of routine cleaning of the school compound:

Pupil’s are eager to make their school more child-friendly by using a wheelbarrow and spades to remove stones, cowpeas husks, papers, bottles and sharp objects to the disposal pits, thus making the compound safe for pupils.

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Sagalla Cluster Ball Games

Report #1 by
Games Master, George Mwaviswa

Today we were privileged to host the Sagalla Cluster Ball Games competition. Over 15 schools took part in four disciplines namely : Football,Volleyball, Handball and Netball for both boys and girls.

Of the 10 participants from our school, 5 managed to proceed for Divisional Ballgames which will take place on 6/6/2018 at Upper Sagalla.

Report #2 by
Mdm Priscillah Nguku & Mdm Beata in charge of the School Lunch Feeding Programme.

Spectators from Sagalla zone schools today converged at the Kileva Eastfield for ball games.

Below you can see Kileva ball games players being served with a special meal to motivate them for their hard work – you see hard work does pay!

It was a great fun day indeed for the pupils at Kileva Eastfield primary school. Such a lovely way to end May month.

Below is the headteacher Mr Mwalwala addressing the crowd, giving a vote of thanks:

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World Environment Day

Report by
Md Priscillah

Today (5/6/2018) was World Environment Day. Pupils and teachers participated in making the environment clean and safe to mark this important day in Eastfield Primary school.

The learners were given gloves to protect them from germs, bottles and sharp objects.

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Lost Maize Harvest

Report by
Mdm Beata in charge of School Feeding Programme

The crops in Kileva Eastfield Primary School have dried up due to shortage of rains. They have not harvested maize. This situation has also been experienced in the villages in Mwakoma. Parents also have not harvested maize crop.

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Testing honey badger deterrent methods

Report by
International Master’s student Abi Johnson

During my time as an intern with the Elephants and Bee Project (EBP) in 2016, I became aware of the fact that honey badger predation of hives often makes the beehive fences less effective. EBP is and has been using metal sheeting on the hive posts to prevent honey badger attacks on hives with some success.

Beehives protected by metal sheeting as a deterrent

Yet, often the honey badger was still able to gain access to the hive. Once on top of the hive honey badgers use claws, teeth and sheer force of will to break through the lid of the hive. This often causes the bees to abscond, leaving the farms vulnerable to elephant crop raiding once again.

Honey badger damage to the lid of a beehive

Therefore, I decided to research economical and non-lethal honey badger deterrents as my Master’s degree thesis project. I am testing how the honey badgers of Sagalla Hill react to motion-activated lights as well as hive protection in the form of wire cages for the hives and cones for the posts. I have added these deterrents, one method per hive, to 18 hives and monitor them using camera traps.

Wire-cage-deterrent-being-installed-during-night-work

Cone-deterrent-being-installed-during-night-work-copy

Camera trap photo featuring an elephant and the cone deterrents

I have been officially collecting data and camera trap footage for just over two months now, during which time my cameras have caught 4 honey badger visitations! Often when I go out into the field I just switch the SD cards and have to wait till I get back to camp to check the footage. Who knew someone’s heart could beat so fast while opening a computer file!? Generally, I get a lot of videos of hares and mongooses, which was cute at first. Yet, those videos lose their appeal when you get a taste of real data producing videos.

I was in the office after dinner sorting through footage when I came across my first honey badger video. I lost my mind a little bit, cheering the little bugger on from my desk. My yells of “climb, climb, climb” attracted my fellow Elephants and Bees team members, by which time I was out of the office dancing around with my computer. Crowded around my computer we all exclaimed in disbelief when the video cut short just as the honey badger reached the top of the post.

Camera trap showing a honey badger climbing a post to access the beehive

Once I calmed down, I saw that the next video was of the hive violently swinging as the badger walked away, meaning the honey badger must have made contact with the hive. Unfortunately, this behavior was not caught on video because of a delay between videos (this setting has since been changed). If the honey badger was able to make contact with the hive via the post, then why didn’t the hive have any damage? I suspect the wire cage deterrent must have done its job and prevented a honey badger raid on the hive. FIRST WIN OF THE PROJECT!

The next video footage of a honey badger came after a farmer, Wabongo, called to say he suspected a honey badger visited his hive. The lid was slightly dislodged and the bees had left. This hive was protected by one of the first cage prototypes, which is shorter than the current design so protects less of the hive. The honey badger spent 50 minutes attempting to gain access to the hive, whereas it only spent two minutes at the previously mentioned hive that had the full cage on it. Perhaps, the honey badger perceived the hive to be more vulnerable, motivating it to continue the raid. This extended raid duration is likely the reason the bees deserted the hive, however, it was a weak/new bee colony. I had to assure Wabongo that although the bees absconded, a stronger colony wouldn’t have left. With some grumbled Swahili, he expressed that he was willing to try the newer cage model on his next hive. I am grateful for the footage and that Wabongo didn’t give up on the project.

Honey badger visiting Hive 4 (light deterrent)

My most recent footage came from hives protected by motion-activated lights! Two hives at the same farm were visited twenty-five minutes apart. Although I can’t claim it’s the same individual scientifically, I bet it is… And if you assume it is the same individual, the honey badger spent much less time looking at the deterrent at the second hive!

Honey badger visiting Hive 4 (light deterrent)

Time diagram of Hive 4 (light deterrent) video: honey badger spent more time looking (orange) at the hive and deterrent

 

Honey badger visiting Hive 12 (light deterrent)

 

Time-diagram-of-Hive-12-light-deterrent-video-less-time-spent-looking-orange

Although I am surprised I got these four visitations and the corresponding videos, I am a bit anxious and greedy to get more! I still have not captured any honey badgers visiting the hives protected by cones. So, here’s to hoping for more honey badgers and that the deterrents continue to work!

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